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Suzanne McDonald discusses social media, women in business on the Dr. Pat Show

The Dr. Pat Show

Dr. Pat discusses social media and being a woman in business with President of Designated Editor Suzanne McDonald.

 

 

 

Are women too reluctant to seek deserved recognition?

Dr. Pat Baccili hosts an online radio talk show which focuses on positive transformation. Dr. Pat is a “coach, teacher, adviser, inspirational speaker, consultant, and internationally acclaimed radio personality,” and won the 2013 Stevie Award Winner for Women Helping Women in Business and Management Team of the Year. Through the Dr. Pat Show and her consultations she encourages others to rid their lives of the “Crust” that holds them back and instead push themselves to do what they would want to achieve if they were not afraid to fail.

President of Designated Editor Suzanne McDonald sat down with her to talk about many topics, including what it’s like to be women in innovative fields, like social media and internet radio. As two Stevie Award Winners, they discussed how it feels to be recognized as innovators in their fields.

Dr. Pat said, “Passion and purpose come before all the awards and the accolades,” and that women tend to not see what they’re doing as “award-worthy.” She laughed that she even feels too busy for awards. “Does that take more than five minutes?” she joked.

McDonald agreed that “This is one of the failings of many women. We’re very humble about what we do – it’s just what we do.”

Dr. Pat asked McDonald what makes Designated Editor different from other technology companies, and she answered that she doesn’t see herself as a technology person, but first and foremost as a communicator.

When asked what McDonald’s personal message is, she replied, “Give yourself time to develop a vision and think about what you want that reality to be in your future, or to help other people, and keep that at the forefront of what you do.”

McDonald showed she’s taken her own advice when she described her own work, including the TickSmart campaign that gained much traction online with the help of four student interns and two other social media experts and included the viral video, TickNado, and Newport Interactive Marketers, a series of events and guest speakers she organizes that teaches and discusses innovative and effective ways of using social media.

Listen to the podcast for more insights on social media, including how busy people can benefit from it most.

Leveraging Social Media for Fundraising and Events

 

Events and fundraisers: Getting folks to show up & give

By Suzanne McDonald

It was a pleasure to return to share my insights with AFP-RI at its annual Fundraising Day conference. As with all my talks, this one was very interactive: Attendees shared their insights and asked a number of great questions. Even before we started, chatting with early-arrivers, I was demo’ing Hootsuite on my iPhone. Nothing like digging in!

If you’re not familiar with AFP-RI, these are the folks behind Save the Bay, the Potter League, Butler Hospital, numerous housing, welfare agencies, women’s shelters, arts organizations, and more. My talk eschewed the obvious Kickstarter and online fund-raising tools: This is more about getting people to show up and truly engage.

The slides above offer a roadmap to enhance nonprofits’ online following through social media sites such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and much more. Much of this talk is adapted from the Event Planning and New Media course I developed and taught at Framingham State University.

Tweets from attendees Association of Fundraising Professionals

Amy Cogan @cogan715   great talk! Thank you for the fantastic, quick, simple tips!!

Michele Berard @MicheleBerard   @AFPRIChapter thx for sharing your expertise in leveraging social media for FR event. #afpmeet. http://Afpri.org 

Social Media tactics to promote and boost your eventsGoogle-Analytics-hostbaby

  • LinkedIn: Sharing your event with groups
  • Twitter & HootSuite, which allow you to set up your tweeting automatically
  • EventBrite, a virtual invitation and guest tracker
  • Facebook & its analytic capabilities
  • Google Analytics is also a great tool to determine your ROI

Other Social Media platforms that may boost your reach  Unknown

  • Pinterest
  • Foursquare
  • Instagram
  • YouTube

You can also follow Suzanne by attending her group of networking sessions and events Newport Interactive Marketers.

Content and Social Media Marketing Webinar

By Suzanne McDonald

If content “is the only marketing left,” as a quote from entrepreneur Seth Godin goes, than businesses better make sure their content is attracting customers.

 

In a webinar by Smart Insights and Bright TALK, “Content and Social Media Marketing,” businesses can learn how to use content for marketing – and what to avoid so content doesn’t harm the brand’s image.

 

What exactly is content marketing? It’s “a marketing technique of creating and distributing relevant and valuable content to attract, acquire and engage a clearly defined target audience,” content marketing authors Joe Pulizzi and Newt Barrett said in their 2009 book, “Get Content, Get Customers.”

 

Content marketing “barely registered as a concept” until a few years ago, according to Google search trends for the topic, as cited in the webinar. Not until early 2011 did searches for “content marketing” finally start to rise – and then they soared.

 

Common content formats:

  •  Facebook
  • Twitter
  • emails to subscriber base
  • A Wiki page
  • blog post
  • LinkedIn
  • press release
  • banner ads

 

Those are the most common formats, and they fall into four “quandrants,” or general styles:

  1. Entertain (example: quizzes or branded videos)
  2. Inspire (celebrity endorsements or community forums)
  3. Convince (case studies or interactive demonstrations)
  4. Educate (infographics or press relases)

 

A few formats fall in between, such as articles, which are on the line between entertain and educate, and ratings, which are between inspire and convince. Ideally, a business would find the right balance between the four quandrants, something that could be struck by having customer reviews or questionnaires.

 

The old saying “quality over quantity” applies to content marketing. If a business overloads its Twitter followers or Facebook fans with too many posts, they would, at minimum, lose effectiveness. At most, those followers and fans would unfollow or post negative remarks.

 

Interesting content is a top-three reason why people follow certain brands on social media, and there are trends to give hints on the best ways companies can utilize their content:

  •  3 in 4 marketers say compelling content is a factor in closing sales.
  •  70% prefer getting to know a company by reading articles rather than advertisements.
  • 60% feel more positive about a company after reading content on its website.

 

A tip to remember, as the webinar puts it: “If you talked to people the way advertising talked to people, they’d punch you in the face.” In other words, engage with customers instead of simply talking to them, and think like a publisher instead of an advertiser.

 

Travel review websites are a great example in the amount of influence they have, especially among younger people. Word-of-mouth marketing is the primary factor behind 20% to 50% of all purchasing decisions.

 

Other tips to consider:

  • Think of what your content will look like on mobile devices – or whether it will even work at all.
  • Most Facebook fans (83% in one study) do not see your posts because they don’t stay visible on newsfeeds for very long.
  • A high number of “likes” and comments on even a plain-text post will drive more reach, or influence, than another post that might seem more likely to attract buzz simply because it has a photo.

 

Facebook has an internal algorithm called EdgeRank that it uses to gauge a user’s influence. It is based on four factors:

  • Affinity, or your relationship with a brand; you are more likely to see a post if your friends engage with it.
  • Type of post. Simple status updates trump other content.
  • Time. The older a post is, the less likely it will be viewed.
  • Level of negative feedback a post and brand receives.

 

Finally, some social media networks are more effective than others, depending on whether your communication is business-to-business or business-to-customer:

  • LinkedIn – the most effective for B2B, but far less so for B2C.
  • Blogs and Twitter have the best balance between both B2B and B2C.
  • Facebook is far more effective for B2C than B2B.
  • Others are far less effective for both methods, including Slideshare, Delicious, Scribd and Flickr.

If  you’d like to listen to the Webinar yourself, check out the BrightTalk Website!

Designated Editor Writes a Book | Retreat Weekend

Book retreat weekend Designated Editor

Book writing goes much faster without distractions and some plush surroundings.

Book Writing Requires Retreat Weekend

Room 202 was a second attempt at the ideal sanctuary to remove distractions and stimulate my book writing. With a sliver of a Bay view, the fireplace blazing, and light streaming in the room’s four windows, it’s nearly everything I was looking for.

I knew I had to get away, despite all that needed to be done at the farmhouse.

Hurricane Sandy had created quite a stick harvest – tree debris strewn everywhere – not to mention the house’s 43 windows still need to be cleaned.

And the daylight shining in spotlighted where the floors had accumulated dust, grass clippings, spider webbings, and more.

For sure my husband was going to guilt me about getting away, especially since the roof of the big barn looked like a giant had peeled a big hole back from the tin roof, just like we used to poke a hole in the bottoms of the chocolates when the Valentine’s box didn’t come with a map. No treats inside the barn, Sandy, but thanks for the big hole in the roof. Instead, Bob’s parting words before closing the side door and heading off to work: “Happy writing!”

Instead, the deal I had found wasn’t available for Friday night. I rearranged my Monday tasks to Saturday morning: graded all the papers, set up next assignments, readings, and announcements for my Event Planning & New Media class. Not quite ready to write one of the 4 chapters I’ve tasked myself with, but at greater ease with the decks fully cleared for the next 2 days.

Considering Writing a Book? Dial into Lisa Tener’s Free Teleseminar on March 19.

Bristol Harbor Inn offers staycation deals in November and December. Bob suggested going someplace more interesting, but 30 minutes from home removes the temptation to explore. I’m here to dive into my book. The Saturday-Sunday night stay rang up to just over $200, with gas fireplace, $50 dining credit, and continental breakfast each day.

Room 202 is in the front of the building with 2 south-facing windows and 2 street-facing. The only change I’d make is more of an easy chair, but the chair I’m in is likely better, less tempting to fall asleep in!

No wifi in the room is also a blessing. Only hardwire, and I do have my laptop, although I’m finding writing on my iPad less work-like.

A few of the secrets from Lisa’s class that have really helped

  • Make the space in your life for your book.
  • Let writing your book be a fun activity, not something you dread.
  • Imagine your readers and how your book will resonate with them, change their lives.

The most surprising aspect so far is how easily it’s coming together, if I create the time and space for it.

And, this experience has transferred to other aspects of my life and business. Most surprising example, getting away while there’s so much work to be done. Fortunately, Bob has become adept at fixing barn roofs; the sticks will be there when I get back and feel like being outside; and I’m spending less than I budgeted and will bring the house cleaners in for an even bigger reward.

Designated Editor Writes a Book | Where to Begin

In my quest to share my insights and expertise in a more structured format, I’m working on a book. But not without help! Lisa Tener’s class is helping to keep me on-target for a first draft in 8 weeks.

See my earlier post on overhauling the Designated Editor brand.

I like to say “Websites age in dog years.” Due to styles, usability preferences, and technology they start to look stale after about 3 years. Or, after 3 years you should be planning a makeover, one of the services Designated Editor provides to clients (shameless plug).

But perhaps the same is true for brands? From when I first launched Designated Editor, 4 years and 2 website designs ago, much has changed. First, when I left The Globe, only newspapers seemed to be headed toward a sinkhole. Now we’ve experienced the Great Recession. While the economy was down, I was filling up on knowledge, starting with SEO and then Social Media, always evolving, but I’m evolving with it.

Part of that evolution is taking my insights and creating a guide to jump-start brands’ new media efforts. The book takes a holistic view of new media, not simply social media. If you’ve been a regular Designated Editor blog reader you’ll find several themes, among them:

  • Search and Social are morphing
  • In-person interactions and social media complement each other
  • Search should be – and is increasing so – about fulfilling user needs

All is not without controversy: Years ago an SEO expert left a comment that challenges my downplay of link-building. Since then search experts know: It’s not about building links but building reputation.

In the Designated Editor brand overhaul, I’m relying on key folks for support, Lisa Tener being first and foremost as I eagerly put my thoughts to paper. If you’re considering writing a book, or completing any major project, here are a few recent tips from Lisa’s workshop that you may find helpful:

Book-writing tips from Lisa Tener

  • Put the book first
  • Beware of new must-dos that may crop up
  • Delegate more
  • Let go of your ego: focus on what you can give, not how others will see it.

Considering Writing a Book? Dial into Lisa Tener’s Free Teleseminar on March 19.

Another tip from a classmate: Don’t get hemmed in by technology. It’s OK to write on your iPhone or iPad and email yourself the document. I write on the sunporch with my iPad, far from my desk, which prohibits interruptions like checking email and answering calls.